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Obama to Russia: More sanctions are 'teed up'

President Barack Obama attends a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the Akasaka State Guest House in Tokyo, Thursday, April 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Junko Kimura-Matsumoto, Pool) TOKYO (AP) — Accusing Russia of failing to live up to its commitments, President Barack Obama warned Moscow on Thursday that the United States has another round of economic sanctions "teed up" — even as he acknowledged those penalties may do little to influence Vladimir Putin's handling of the crisis in Ukraine.


Russia not abiding by Geneva agreement says Obama

A pro-Russian armed man stands guard near the state security service building in Slaviansk Donetsk (Ukraine) (AFP) - US President Barack Obama accused Russia on Thursday of failing to respect an agreement to defuse the crisis in Ukraine, the latest salvo in the Cold War-like duel between Washington and Moscow over the future of the ex-Soviet nation. Obama's comments came as the interior and defence ministries said Thursday Ukraine's military clashed with pro-Kremlin rebels in two eastern towns overnight. Obama said Washington was ready to slap fresh sanctions on Moscow, a day after Russia, which has massed tens of thousands of troops on its border with Ukraine, warned that it was ready to strike if its interests were attacked.


Last year's deadbeats do best as stocks stall

FILE - In this Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012 file photo, a technician prepares 1 Kg gold bars of 995.0 purity to pack for delivery at the Emirates Gold company in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Safer investments like utilities, gold and government bonds were supposed to flop in 2014 as investors pulled out their money and put it into higher risk, higher growth stocks that benefit from a pickup in the economy. But instead of fading, “safe haven” investments are among the year’s best performers. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili, File) NEW YORK (AP) — Financial markets rarely stick to the script, and this year is no different.


Oklahoma court rejects death-row inmates' claims

This photo combo of images provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows Clayton Lockett, left, and Charles Warner. Lockett and Warner, two death-row inmates who want to know the source of drugs that will be used to execute them, have placed Oklahoma’s two highest courts at odds and prompted aggravated members of the Legislature to call for the impeachment of Oklahoma Supreme Court justices. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections) Court says inmates are not entitled to know source of drugs that will be used to kill them.


U.S. regulators to propose new net neutrality rules in May

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies before the House Communications and Technology panel on Capitol Hill in Washington By Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. regulators are expected to vote on May 15 on a new set of so-called "net neutrality" rules aimed at making certain that broadband providers do not slow down or block consumers' access to legal Internet content. The rules from the Federal Communications Commission, which released its framework in February, are expected to ensure network operators disclose how they manage Internet traffic and do not block any content on the Web. The proposed rules are also expected to allow Internet providers to negotiate agreements with content providers on delivery of traffic to users as long as the deals they strike are "commercially reasonable," according to an FCC spokesman. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has also said he planned to review the practices adopted by Internet providers on a case-by-case basis.


Vermont moves toward labeling of GMO foods

FILE - Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin participates in the morning session of the National Governor's Association Winter Meeting in Washington, in this Feb. 22, 2014 file photo. Vermont lawmakers have passed the country's first state bill to require the labeling of genetically modified foods as such, setting up a war between powerful lobbyists for the behemoth U.S. food industry and an American public that overwhelmingly says it approves of the idea. The Vermont House approved the measure Wednesday evening, April 23, 2014 about a week after the state Senate, and Gov. Peter Shumlin said he plans to sign it. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Vermont lawmakers have passed the country's first state bill to require the labeling of genetically modified foods as such, setting up a war between powerful lobbyists for the behemoth U.S. food industry and an American public that overwhelmingly says it approves of the idea.


Obama: New sanctions against Russia are 'teed up'

President Barack Obama speaks as he participates in a joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the Akasaka Palace state guest house in Tokyo Thursday, April 24, 2014. Obama says the time is now to resolve issues preventing the conclusion of a major, 12-nation trade agreement. Opening a four-country swing through the Asia-Pacific region, Obama is aiming to promote the U.S. as a committed economic, military and political partner, but the West's dispute with Russia over Ukraine threatens to cast a shadow over the president's sales mission. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) TOKYO (AP) — Warning Russia that new economic sanctions are "teed up," President Barack Obama accused Moscow of failing to live up to an agreement last week to ease tensions in eastern Ukraine.


FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014 photo, Talia Eisenberg, co-founder of the Henley Vaporium, uses her vaping device in New York. Soon, the Food and Drug Administration will propose rules for e-cigarettes. The rules will have big implications for a fast-growing industry and its legions of customers. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File) The government wants to ban sales to minors and require health warning labels.


All at sea: global shipping fleet exposed to hacking threat

A magnifying glass is held in front of a computer screen in this picture illustration taken in Berlin By Jeremy Wagstaff SINGAPORE (Reuters) - The next hacker playground: the open seas - and the oil tankers and container vessels that ship 90 percent of the goods moved around the planet. Somali pirates help choose their targets by viewing navigational data online, prompting ships to either turn off their navigational devices, or fake the data so it looks like they're somewhere else; While data on the extent of the maritime industry's exposure to cyber crime is hard to come by, a study of the related energy sector by insurance brokers Willis this month found that the industry "may be sitting on an uninsured time bomb". Globally, it estimated that cyber attacks against oil and gas infrastructure will cost energy companies close to $1.9 billion by 2018.


Women held in Cleveland basement seek Joan Rivers' apology

SiriusXM's "Howard Stern Birthday Bash" - Arrivals CLEVELAND (AP) — Attorneys for two women held in a Cleveland home and abused for a decade say Joan Rivers should apologize for comparing living in her daughter's guest room with the captivity they experienced.


FCC to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new open Internet rules that would allow content companies to pay for faster delivery over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes, but enhance scrutiny of such deals so they don't harm competition or limit free speech.

3-D imaging captures 1888 wreckage discovered in San Francisco Bay

This 2013 image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows a multi-beam sonar profile view of the shipwreck of the iron and wood steamship City of Chester. In 1888 on a trip from the San Francisco bay to Eureka, the Chester was split in two by a ship more than twice its size, killing 16 people and becoming the bay's second-worst maritime disaster. Now, more than a century later, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration team has found the shipwreck. The team came upon the wreckage in 217 feet of water just inside the Golden Gate while it was charting shipping channels. (AP Photo/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The first images of the newly discovered wreckage of a steamship that sank in San Francisco Bay in 1888, killing 16 people, were released Wednesday by federal ocean scientists.


Formula One racing boss set to go on trial for bribery

Canadian F1 Grand Prix - Race By Keith Weir MUNICH (Reuters) - Formula One chief executive Bernie Ecclestone goes on trial for bribery in Germany on Thursday in a case that could see the Briton's long dominance of the motor sport ended by a jail sentence. Prosecutors in Munich have charged Ecclestone, 83, with bribing jailed German banker Gerhard Gribkowsky to smooth the sale eight years ago of a stake in Formula One to private equity firm CVC. Ecclestone, a former used car salesman who became a billionaire by building the sport into a global money spinner over the past four decades, denies wrongdoing and says he will fight to clear his name. CVC remains the largest shareholder in Formula One, a business that generates annual revenues of over $1.5 billion from its series of grand prix races held around the world.


Prince Charles' brother-in-law dies in NYC after fall

Mark Shand NEW YORK (AP) — The brother-in-law of the Prince of Wales died Wednesday after falling outside a hotel bar and suffering a head injury, police said.


Man killed in Utah court had promised judge he'd behave

This Feburary 2012 photo, provided by the Utah Department of Corrections, shows Siale Angilau. A U.S. marshal shot and critically wounded Angilau on Monday, April 21, 2014, in a new federal courthouse after Angilau rushed the witness stand with a pen at his trial in Salt Lake City, authorities said. Angilau was one of 17 people named in a 29-count racketeering indictment filed in 2008 accusing gang members of conspiracy, assault, robbery and weapons offenses. The FBI said Angilau died Monday at the hospital. (AP Photo/Utah Department of Corrections) SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Tongan Crip gang defendant who was fatally shot by a U.S. marshal while attacking a witness during a federal court trial had promised a judge earlier that he would behave, a court transcript shows.


Oldest living ex-MLB player dies in Cuba at 102

Conrado Marrero, oldest living ex-MLB player, dies at 102 (Photo taken on April 25, 2012.) (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes) HAVANA (AP) — Conrado Marrero, the diminutive Cuban right-hander who pitched for the Washington Senators in the 1950s and in 2011 became the oldest living former Major League Baseball player, died in Havana on Wednesday. He was 102, just two days short of his 103rd birthday.


Soldier convicted in WikiLeaks case gets new name

U.S. Army, Pfc. Chelsea Manning Kansas judge grants Bradley Edward Manning's request to become Chelsea Elizabeth Manning.


Bungling N.C. kidnap plot spotlights justice workers' exposure

FILE - In this undated file photo provided by Raleigh/Wake City-County Bureau of Identification, Kelvin Melton is shown. A North Carolina prosecutor was the intended target of an elaborate kidnapping plot, but the kidnappers looked up the wrong address on the Internet and abducted the prosecutor's father instead, according to an indictment released Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Authorities have said the kidnapping was retaliation for Colleen Janssen's prosecution of Melton for his involvement in a 2011 shooting. Melton, a high-ranking member of the Bloods gang, orchestrated the abduction from behind bars using a cellphone, the indictment said. (AP Photo/Raleigh/Wake City-County Bureau of Identification, File) Part bumbling, part dead serious, the sprawling jailhouse plot to kidnap a North Carolina prosecutor who put a seasoned gang member in prison for life has shaken a US justice system already enduring a slew of deadly attacks. A federal indictment released Tuesday details a complex plot said to be orchestrated by Kelvin “Dizzy” Melton, a North Carolina prison inmate and alleged higher-up in the Bloods street gang, to pay $10,000 to a group of henchmen on the outside to kidnap and kill his defense attorney and the prosecutor who put him in prison for a 2011 murder.  The plot led the group of nine accomplices first on a goose chase in March from Atlanta to New Orleans, and then to the small town of Wake Forest, N.C., where the group on April 5 grabbed Frank Janssen, the father of Wake County prosecutor Colleen Janssen, after stun-gunning him on the threshold of his home. Ms. Janssen, the actual target, was part of the team that put Mr. Melton away last year.


CEO of 'Russian Facebook' flees country

In this photo taken Saturday, May 19, 2012, Pavel Durov, founder of Russia's leading social network site VKontakte, or "in contact", sits in a cafe in Red Square in Moscow, Russia. Creator of Russia's leading social network Durov left his post as CEO on Tuesday April 22, 2014, and is understood to have left Russia, one week after he posted online what he said were documents from the security services demanding personal details from 39 Ukraine-linked groups on VKontakte.(AP Photo/Roman Kulik) Social media wunderkind quits post after Putin cronies stage ownership takeover.


Brazil's Rousseff praises U.S. for relaxing grip on Internet

Brazil's President Rousseff attends the opening ceremony for the NETmundial: Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance conference in Sao Paulo By Esteban Israel SAO PAULO (Reuters) - Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff praised the United States on Wednesday for its decision to ease control over the Internet and called for a more democratic, transparent network following the U.S. National Security Agency spying scandal. Rousseff spoke at a global conference that she convened on how to govern a safer, less U.S.-centered Internet after revelations that she and other world leaders had been spied upon by the NSA. Rousseff hailed President Barack Obama's decision to hand off control of ICANN, a California-based non-profit in charge of assigning Internet domains or addresses, to an international oversight body that has yet to be decided on. Revelations last year by former NSA analyst Edward Snowden that the United States spied on Internet users with secret programs prompted worldwide calls for reducing U.S. control of the network now connecting one-third of the world's population.


'Murdered' Ukraine politician faced hostile mob, video shows

Photos of the day - February 21, 2014 The Ukrainian town Councilor whose apparent torture and murder helped to prompt a threatened new government offensive in the east was mobbed by a hostile, pro-Russian crowd before he disappeared, a video of the incident shows. The apparent murder of Volodymyr Rybak and a second man prompted the European Union to call on Russia to use its influence to stop kidnappings and killings in mainly Russian-speaking eastern Ukraine, scene of separatist rebellions against Kiev's leaders. Ukraine's security service said a rogue officer and a member of Russian military intelligence were involved in Rybak's killing. The footage from April 17 on local news site gorlovka.ua shows angry scenes outside the town hall of Horlivka, between the separatist flashpoint cities of Donetsk and Slaviansk, as Rybak is manhandled by several men, among them a masked man in camouflage, while other people hurl abuse.


Netflix to debut an original Spanish-language series in 2015

The Netflix logo is is shown on an ipad in Encinitas, California Netflix Inc on Wednesday announced its first original Spanish-language television series, a bid by the video-streaming company to attract subscribers in Latin America and Spanish speakers in the United States Netflix said the series, a 13-episode comedy about a family feud among the heirs to a soccer club, is slated to premiere in 2015 and will be shot in Mexico. The series, which is so far untitled, will be produced by Gaz Alazraki, the director of the popular 2013 Mexican comedy film "Nosotros los Nobles" ("We Are the Nobles"), and star Mexican actor Luis Gerardo Mendez. Netflix's venture into original programming, which includes political thriller "House of Cards" and comedy-drama "Orange Is the New Black," has earned the first Emmy Awards for an online-only company. Netflix is available in much of Latin America.


Ukraine militants: We're holding U.S. journalist over 'destabilizing' reports

In this photo taken on Sunday, April 13, 2014, a reporter Simon Ostrovsky, right, stands next to a Pro-Russian gunman at a seized police station in the eastern Ukraine town of Slovyansk. Pro-Russian gunmen in eastern Ukraine say they are holding an American journalist captive. Ostrovsky, a journalist for Vice News, has not been seen since early Tuesday. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky) Pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine on Wednesday confirmed they are detaining a U.S. journalist working with Vice News. The self-declared separatist mayor of Slaviansk told reporters the journalist, Simon Ostrovsky, had been detained for reporting what he said was false information that was "destabilizing for us" but that he was being treated well. Mayor Vyacheslav Ponomaryov attempted to joke about the situation. Vice News has said on its website that it is in contact with the U.S. State Department and other government authorities to work toward securing the safety of its journalist.


Amazon grabs rights to stream older HBO shows

The logo for HBO is pictured at the Cable portion of the Television Critics Association Summer press tour in Beverly Hills Amazon.com's streaming video service will offer some older shows from premium-cable channel HBO starting next month, a deal that intensifies both companies' competition with subscription-video service Netflix. This is the first time HBO, owned by Time Warner Inc, has licensed its award-winning programming to an online subscription streaming service, the companies said in a statement on Wednesday. HBO shows are not available through Netflix. Netflix shares fell 4.7 percent to $355.31 on Nasdaq.


NYPD Twitter campaign backfires, thousands of negative tweets

NYPD graduate Lormel polishes her badge backstage before her induction ceremony in New York By Chris Francescani NEW YORK (Reuters) - A New York Police Department campaign to burnish its image via social media instead produced a flood of pictures of apparent police brutality and tweets critical of the force being shared at a rate of thousands an hour. Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said on Wednesday he would continue and expand the NYPD Twitter campaign a day after it backfired, triggering an outpouring of negative images including police violence at New York's Occupy Wall Street demonstrations, an NYPD officer pointing a gun at a dog, and an officer asleep in a subway car. "Most of those photos that I looked at are old news," said Bratton, appointed by Mayor Bill de Blasio to take over from Ray Kelly, who served for 12 years under de Blasio's predecessor, Michael Bloomberg.


Exclusive: FBI warns healthcare sector vulnerable to cyber attacks

A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser in Paris By Jim Finkle BOSTON (Reuters) - The FBI has warned healthcare providers their cybersecurity systems are lax compared to other sectors, making them vulnerable to attacks by hackers searching for Americans' personal medical records and health insurance data. Health data is far more valuable to hackers on the black market than credit card numbers because it tends to contain details that can be used to access bank accounts or obtain prescriptions for controlled substances. "The healthcare industry is not as resilient to cyber intrusions compared to the financial and retail sectors, therefore the possibility of increased cyber intrusions is likely," the Federal Bureau of Investigation said in a private notice it has been distributing to healthcare providers, obtained by Reuters.


Court tosses $3.4M award to child porn victim

FILE - This Dec. 19, 2013, file photo shows a view of the Supreme Court from near the top of the Capitol Dome on Capitol Hill, in Washington. The Supreme Court is hearing arguments in a case that asks whether a victim of child pornography can seek millions of dollars from a defendant who had just two images of her on his computer. The woman known only as Amy is trying to persuade the justices in arguments on Jan. 22, 2014, that people convicted of possessing child pornography should be held liable for the entire cost of the harm their victims suffer, including in psychiatric care, lost income and legal fees. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File) Supreme Court says man found with pictures not responsible for entirety of woman's losses.


Shakeup marks new era for pardon process

United States Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the National Action Network convention in New York, Wednesday, April 9, 2014. The 16th annual convention will run through April 12. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) New program focused on thousands of clemency petitions from nonviolent federal inmates.


Prince's bird hunt stirs outrage in Pakistan after Saudi loan

houbara bustard Pakistan has long enjoyed close ties to Gulf Arab sheiks, but a prince's recent shooting spree that culled more than 2,000 rare birds from the country's preserves have stirred outrage in the country, following a $1.5 billion Saudi "gift" to the country's ailing economy.


Obama's Japan visit kicks off with dreams of sushi

President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe depart Sukiyabashi Jiro sushi restaurant in Tokyo, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Opening a four-country swing through the Asia-Pacific region, Obama is aiming to promote the U.S. as a committed economic, military and political partner, but the West's dispute with Russia over Ukraine threatens to cast a shadow over the president's sales mission. Japanese at right in the background reads: "Sushi." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) But for two special guests at Sukiyabashi Jiro on Wednesday evening, mouthfuls of melt-in-the-mouth tuna, squid, and octopus were the culinary backdrop to discussing urgent matters of regional security. Soon after Air Force One touched down here, Barack Obama found himself in Tokyo’s upmarket Ginza district, tucked behind the counter of arguably the world’s best sushi restaurant with his Japanese host, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Sukiyabashi Jiro’s modest size – it has just 10 seats – is inversely proportionate to its reputation. The 19-piece special course, featuring a selection chosen by owner Jiro Ono, costs around $300, not including drinks.


'Excellent work': Spacewalking astronauts complete urgent fix

Steven Swanson and Rick Mastracchio perform a spacewalk on Wednesday CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Spacewalking astronauts easily replaced a dead computer outside the International Space Station on Wednesday and got their orbiting home back up to full strength.


Michigan man among first in U.S. to get 'bionic eye'

Dr. Naheed Khan works with Roger Pontz Roger Pontz, nearly completely blind for years, has regained sight through high-tech procedure.


Judge to mull Chelsea Manning name change request

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning outside a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md. Serving a 35-year sentence for passing classified U.S. government information, Chelsea Manning's petition to legally change her name from Bradley will be considered.


New York teen gamer latest victim of 'swatting,' police say

A hoaxer who triggered a massive police response was engaged in an increasingly popular prank called "swatting," authorities there say.

Obama wades into testy China-Japan feud

President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands before having dinner at Sukiyabashi Jiro sushi restaurant in Tokyo, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Opening a four-country swing through the Asia-Pacific region, Obama is aiming to promote the U.S. as a committed economic, military and political partner, but the West's dispute with Russia over Ukraine threatens to cast a shadow over the president's sales mission. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) Security treaty with Japan applies to China-Japan dispute, the president confirms.


S. Korea ferry turned further than ordered, professor says

Divers look for people believed to have been trapped in the sunken ferry Sewol in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, south of Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. The grim work of recovering bodies from the submerged South Korea ferry proceeded rapidly Wednesday, with the official death toll reaching over 140, though a government official said divers must now rip through cabin walls to retrieve more victims. (AP Photo/Yonhap) KOREA OUT A maritime professor who spoke with the third mate who was steering the South Korean ferry before it sank said Wednesday that he suspects there was a problem with the steering gear.


Memorial for S. Korea ferry victims opens in Ansan

A mourner weeps as he pays tribute to the victims of the sunken ferry Sewol in the water off the southern coast at a gymnasium, in Ansan, South Korea, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. The victims are overwhelmingly students of a single high school in Ansan, near Seoul. More than three-quarters of the 323 students are dead or missing, while nearly two-thirds of the other 153 people on board the ferry Sewol when it sank one week ago survived. (AP Photo/Korea Pool) KOREA OUT The city south of Seoul has taken the brunt of the pain from the ferry sinking last week that left 302 people dead or missing.


Pro-Russian insurgents hold U.S. journalist captive

In this photo taken on Sunday, April 13, 2014, a reporter Simon Ostrovsky, right, stands next to a Pro-Russian gunman at a seized police station in the eastern Ukraine town of Slovyansk. Pro-Russian gunmen in eastern Ukraine say they are holding an American journalist captive. Ostrovsky, a journalist for Vice News, has not been seen since early Tuesday. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky) Gunmen say Simon Ostrovsky, a reporter for Vice News, was suspected of unspecified "bad activities."


Material on Australian shore examined in jet hunt

In this map provided on Wednesday, April 23, 2014, by the Joint Agency Coordination Centre, details are presented in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the southern Indian Ocean. The hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet will likely soon deploy more powerful sonar equipment that can delve deeper as the current search of the most likely crash site in the Indian Ocean has failed to yield any clues, Australia's defense minister said Wednesday. (AP Photo/Joint Agency Coordination Centre) EDITORIAL USE ONLY Unidentified material is being examined for any link to the lost Malaysian plane.


Gacy case helps solve unrelated death

John Wayne Gacy's police arrest photo from Dec. 21, 1978. Four decades later, the killer's case is helping authorities solve another murder — one he didn't commit.


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