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Hamas: Missing soldier likely killed in strike

This undated photo shows Israeli Army 2nd. Lt. Hadar Goldin, 23 from Kfar Saba, central Israel. Israeli army spokesman Lt. Col. Peter Lerner said Friday, Aug. 1, 2014 that Goldin was apparently captured by Hamas militants who came through a tunnel from the Gaza Strip and another two soldiers were killed. An hour after Friday's cease-fire started, gunmen emerged from one or more Gaza tunnels and opened fire at Israeli soldiers, with at least one of the militants detonating an explosives vest, said Lerner. Goldin was apparently captured during the ensuing mayhem and taken back into Gaza through a tunnel. (AP Photo/YNet News) GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — The Hamas military on Saturday distanced itself from the disappearance of a soldier Israel says is suspected to have been captured by Hamas fighters in Gaza.


Americans with Ebola returning to US for treatment

This Oct. 7, 2013 photo provided by Jeremy Writebol show his mother, Nancy Writebol, with children in Liberia. Writebol is one of two Americans working for a missionary group in Liberia that have been diagnosed with Ebola. Plans are underway to bring back the two Americans from Africa for treatment. (AP Photo/Courtesy Jeremy Writebol) NEW YORK (AP) — Two American aid workers seriously ill with Ebola will be brought from West Africa to Atlanta for treatment in one of the most tightly sealed isolation units in the country, officials said Friday.


House OKs bill to address border crisis

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio defends the work of the GOP during a brief news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 31, 2014, as Congress prepares to leave for a five-week summer recess. The institutional split of a Republican-led House and Democratic-controlled Senate has added up to inaction, especially in a midterm election year with control of the Senate at stake. Lawmakers have struggled to compromise on a handful of bills to deal with the nation's pressing problems amid overwhelming partisanship. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) House Republicans passed legislation late Friday to address the crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border by sending migrant youths back home without hearings, winning over conservatives with a companion bill that could lead to deporting more than half a million immigrants whom the Obama administration granted temporary work permits. President Barack Obama condemned the Republican action and said he'd act unilaterally, as best he could.


Ebola-hit countries move to seal off hot zones, borders

Some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion is revealed in this undated handout colorized transmission electron micrograph West Africa's Ebola-hit nations have agreed to impose a cross-border isolation zone at the epicentre of the world's worst-ever outbreak, amid warnings that the deadly epidemic is spiralling out of control. The announcement came at an emergency summit in the Guinean capital on Friday to discuss the outbreak, which has killed more than 700 people, with the World Health Organization warning Ebola could cause "catastrophic" loss of life and severe economic disruption if it continued to spread. "We have agreed to take important and extraordinary actions at the inter-country level to focus on cross-border regions that have more than 70 percent of the epidemic," said Hadja Saran Darab, the secretary-general of the Mano River Union bloc grouping the nations. Opening the summit, WHO chief Margaret Chan told leaders that the response of the three countries to the epidemic had been "woefully inadequate", revealing that the outbreak was "moving faster than our efforts to control it".


Autopsy: Police chokehold caused NYC man's death

FILE- In this undated family file photo provided by the National Action Network, Saturday, July 19, 2014, Eric Garner is shown. Garner’s death was ruled a homicide by the New York City medical examiner after it was determined that a choke hold police used while trying to arrest him in July 2014, caused his death. (AP Photo/Family photo via National Action Network, File) NEW YORK (AP) — A medical examiner ruled Friday that a police officer's chokehold caused the death of a man whose videotaped arrest and final pleas of "I can't breathe!" sparked outrage and led to the overhaul of use-of-force training for the nation's largest police department.


2 Americans detained in North Korea seek US help

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Two American tourists charged with "anti-state" crimes in North Korea said Friday they expect to be tried soon and pleaded for help from the U.S. government to secure their release from what they say could be long prison terms.


Virginia ex-governor's corruption trial jury sees racy email

Former Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell arrives with his legal team for his trial in Richmond By Gary Robertson RICHMOND Va. (Reuters) - The federal jury hearing the corruption trial of former Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell on Friday saw a racy email his wife sent to a businessman, a communication defense attorneys said was proof that the two were having an affair. Lawyers for McDonnell's wife, Maureen, said at the start of the trial that the couple's marriage had been unraveling at the time they accepted gifts from a businessman they said Maureen McDonnell had a "crush" on. Maureen McDonnell's attorney on Friday showed the jury at U.S. District Court in Richmond an email his client sent to Williams on Aug. 23, 2011, the day an earthquake rocked the U.S. East Coast. Defense attorneys tried to distance the former governor from Williams, saying the interaction was primarily between the businessman and Maureen McDonnell.


US brings 2 Americans sick with Ebola back home

This undated handout photo obtained on July 30, 2014 courtesy of Samaritan's Purse shows Dr. Kent Brantly near Monrovia, Liberia Two Americans infected with Ebola in West Africa will be evacuated back to the United States in the coming days to be cared for in strict isolation, officials said Friday. Kent Brantly, a doctor who was treating Ebola patients in Liberia, and Christian missionary worker Nancy Writebol, are being flown home, but it was not immediately clear when they would arrive back in the US. Meanwhile US President Barack Obama said that delegates from Ebola-hit countries attending a US-Africa summit next week in Washington and who may have been exposed to the deadly virus would be screened before leaving their countries. The World Health Organization said the fast-moving outbreak was causing "catastrophic" loss of life in the affected countries of Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.


2 Americans with Ebola arrive in the US

Dr. Kent Brantly in Liberia (Courtesy Samaritan's Purse) Two Americans seriously ill with the deadly Ebola virus should arrive in the U.S. from West Africa by early next week.


War of words erupts between Larry King & Piers Morgan

IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR DISCOVERY COMMUNICATIONS - Legendary journalist Larry King speaks to Brian Lowry, TV Critic, Variety, as a part of a panel during the "OJ: Trial of the Century" Premiere at The Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills, Calif. on Thursday, June 12, 2014. (Danny Moloshok/ AP Images for Discovery Communications Inc.) NEW YORK (AP) — Clearly, former CNN prime-time stars Larry King and Piers Morgan aren't big fans of each other.


Obama: After 9/11, ‘we tortured some folks’

President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. The president spoke on various topics including the economy, immigration, Ukraine and the Middle East. (AP Photo/Connor Radnovich) President Obama urged that US officials who used torture not be judged too harshly.


Israel pushes deeper in Gaza after soldier seized

Palestinian children wounded in Israeli shelling are treated in a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Eyad Baba) GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Backed by tank fire and airstrikes, Israeli forces pushed deep into southern Gaza on Friday, searching for an Israeli army officer believed to be captured by Hamas fighters during deadly clashes that shattered an internationally brokered cease-fire.


Official: NYC Police chokehold ruled a homicide

NYPD 'Chokehold' Death Raises Questions Over Use of Force NEW YORK (AP) — A chokehold used by a police officer on a New York City man during his arrest for selling untaxed, loose cigarettes last month caused his death, the medical examiner announced Friday, ruling it a homicide.


Canadian police launch anti-sexting app for kids

A Canadian police sex crimes unit offered a sneak peak Friday of an app to help kids rebuff requests for naked pics online, amid what authorities called a sexting "epidemic" A Canadian police sex crimes unit offered a sneak peak Friday of an app to help kids rebuff requests for naked pics online, amid what authorities called a sexting "epidemic." The "Send This Instead" free app, to be offered by the Ontario Provincial Police, provides 57 humorous and sarcastic retorts to sexting requests, as well as a link to police to report sexual harassment. It is aimed at Canadian teens, but will be available worldwide when it is officially launched at the Crimes Against Children Conference in Dallas, Texas on August 11-14. "When you are feeling pressured to send intimate images to someone online, Send This Instead," reads a description of the app on Apple's and Google's app stores.


Obama says after 9-11, US 'tortured some folks'

US President Barack Obama makes a statement while at the White House in Washington WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States tortured al Qaida detainees captured after the 9/11 attacks, President Obama said Friday, in some of his most expansive comments to date about a controversial set of CIA practices that he banned after taking office.


Teen girl to get head examined after setting 2K acre wildfire

San Diego wildfire A teenage girl charged with setting a California wildfire that burned 2,000 acres (800 hectares) and destroyed some 40 structures north of San Diego in May has been ordered by a judge to submit to a mental competency exam, prosecutors said on Friday. She has been identified only by her first name, Cheyenne, because she is a minor. Cheyenne, who could be required to stand trial as an adult, was ordered to undergo the mental competency evaluation by a judge during a hearing earlier this week, San Diego County District Attorney's spokeswoman Tanya Sierra said.


AP-GfK poll: Public ready to close book on 2 wars

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three in four Americans think history will judge the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan as failures, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll that shows that about the same percentage think it was right to pull forces from the two countries.

Ukraine: Body parts retrieved at jet crash site

Australian and Dutch experts examine a piece of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 plane, near the village of Hrabove, Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine Friday, Aug.1, 2014. The investigators from the Netherlands and Australia plus officials with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe traveled from the rebel-held city of Donetsk in 15 cars and a bus to the crash site outside the village of Hrabove. Then they started setting up a base to work from at a chicken farm. The investigative team's top priority is to recover human remains that have been rotting in midsummer heat of 90 degrees (32 degrees Celsius) since the plane went down on July 17. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky) HRABOVE, Ukraine (AP) — Wearing gloves and carrying blue plastic buckets, international investigators finally began gathering up body parts and victims' belongings Friday in the fields where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 came down.


Why isn't there a treatment or vaccine for Ebola?

FILE - In this Saturday, Sept. 29, 2007, file photo, A 43 year old Congolese patient, center, who has been confirmed to have Ebola hemorrhagic fever, following laboratory tests, is comforted by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders) nurse Isabel Grovas, left, and Doctor Hilde Declerck, right, in Kampungu, Kasai Occidental province, Congo. In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn’t changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease. A number are being developed, but none have been rigorously tested in humans. One experimental treatment, though, was tried this week in an American aid worker sick with Ebola, according to the U.S-based group that she works for in Liberia. Without a specific treatment, doctors and nurses focus on easing the disease’s symptoms _ fever, headache, vomiting and diarrhea _ and on keeping patients hydrated and comfortable. (AP Photo/WHO, Christopher Black, File) LONDON (AP) — In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn't changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease.


Obama: Israeli soldier must be freed

President Barack Obama speaks about Congress, foreign policy and immigration, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) 'Unconditional release' is required If Hamas wants to resolve Gaza conflict, Obama says.


New alcohol rehab center opens in...Iran?

Female Iranian worshippers take part in the Eid al-Fitr prayer that marks the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, in Shahr-e-Ray, south of Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi) TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran has opened the country's first, state-run rehab and treatment center for alcoholism, an Iranian semi-official news agency reported on Friday.


Facebook restores service after outage in many countries

Facebook error By Alexei Oreskovic SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook Inc said service to the world's largest online social network was fully restored on Friday, following a widespread outage that affected users in multiple countries. "Earlier this morning, some people had trouble accessing Facebook for a short time. We quickly investigated and have fully restored service for everyone. We’re sorry for the inconvenience," Facebook said in an emailed statement.


2014 game changer? New Florida voting map ordered

Gerrymandering may end with new redistricting requirements TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida judge on Friday ordered legislators to hold a special session to draw up a new congressional map for the state after the old one was ruled to be illegal.


Aereo, 'bleeding to death,' seeks emergency court help

Aereo presses case despite Supreme Court setback By Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) - Aereo Inc, the video streaming company that suspended service after the U.S. Supreme Court found it violated copyrights of television broadcasters, has urged a federal judge to let it operate like a cable system, saying it likely would not otherwise survive. In a Thursday night filing with the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, the start-up backed by billionaire Barry Diller said it needed emergency help because it could not continue incurring "staggering costs" without having revenue come in, and required "some time" to make the necessary technological changes. "Unless it is able to resume operations in the immediate future, the company will likely not survive," Aereo said. "The company is figuratively bleeding to death." Bruce Keller, a partner at Debevoise & Plimpton representing the broadcasters, declined to comment on Friday.


'Bleeding to death': Aereo seeks court's help to function as cable company

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, file photo, Chet Kanojia, founder and CEO of television-over-the-Internet service Aereo, Inc., shows a tablet displaying his company's technology, in New York. After the Supreme Court's ruling against the company, Aereo is now using the high court's own language to force broadcasters to treat it just like other cable TV companies. In Aereo’s view, that means broadcasters must license its signals to Aereo under a 1976 copyright law. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File) By Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) - Aereo Inc, the video streaming company that suspended service after the U.S. Supreme Court found it violated copyrights of television broadcasters, has urged a federal judge to let it operate like a cable system, saying it likely would not otherwise survive. In a Thursday night filing with the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, the start-up backed by billionaire Barry Diller said it needed emergency help because it could not continue incurring "staggering costs" without having revenue come in, and required "some time" to make the necessary technological changes. "Unless it is able to resume operations in the immediate future, the company will likely not survive," Aereo said. "The company is figuratively bleeding to death." Bruce Keller, a partner at Debevoise & Plimpton representing the broadcasters, declined to comment on Friday.


Cheers: French hospital plans wine bar for terminally ill

The wine bar will be housed in the hospital's palliative care unit A hospital in the French city of Clermont-Ferrand is to open a wine bar where terminally ill patients will be able to enjoy a "medically-supervised" glass or two with their families. Nothing justifies such an prohibition," the Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital Center said in statement. The center's head, Dr. Virginie Guastella, said terminally ill patients had the right to "enjoy themselves". Although some researchers have long held that an antioxidant found in red wine is good for the heart, some recent research has determined that wine's health benefits are exaggerated.


LinkedIn's hiring business seen key to growth

The logo for LinkedIn Corporation, a social networking networking website for people in professional occupations, is shown in Mountain View (Reuters) - LinkedIn Corp's booming hiring business and rapid international expansion will be the main growth drivers for the next few quarters, analysts said after the corporate networking site's revenue and profit forecast smashed expectations. LinkedIn's shares rose 8 percent to $194.90 in early trading after the company also reported a 47 percent jump in second-quarter revenue on Thursday. Revenue in the company's hiring business, called Talent Solutions, jumped 49 percent, assuaging concerns of market saturation that surfaced after LinkedIn forecast 2014 revenue below analysts' expectations in May. "LinkedIn's current roster of a little over 28,000 corporate solutions clients implies a minority penetration rate for Talent Solutions on a global base of about 745,000 addressable businesses that have more than 100 employees," Credit Suisse analysts wrote in a client note. Credit Suisse maintained its "outperform" rating on the stock.


Student starts global class action against Facebook

A Facebook logo on an Ipad is reflected among source code on the LCD screen of a computer in this photo illustration By Georgina Prodhan VIENNA (Reuters) - Austrian law student Max Schrems appealed to a billion Facebook users around the world on Friday to join a class-action lawsuit against Facebook's alleged violations of its users' privacy, stepping up a years-long data-protection campaign. Schrems, a thorn in Facebook's side who has a case involving the social network pending at the European Court of Justice, has filed a claim at Vienna's commercial court and invited others to join the action at www.fbclaim.com using their Facebook login. Under Austrian law, a group of people may transfer their financial claims to a single person - in this case, Schrems. Legal proceedings are then effectively run as a class action.


Hacking attack in Canada bears signs of Chinese army unit: expert

Illustration file picture shows a man typing on a computer keyboard in Warsaw By David Ljunggren and Alastair Sharp OTTAWA/TORONTO (Reuters) - The recent hacking attempt on a sensitive Canadian government computer network is similar to attacks mounted by an elite unit of the Chinese army based in Shanghai, according to a cybersecurity expert. Canada said on Tuesday "a highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored actor" had broken into the National Research Council, a leading body that works with major companies such as aircraft and train maker Bombardier Inc . Beijing on Thursday accused Canada of making irresponsible accusations that lacked credible evidence. While Canada did not give details of the attack, CrowdStrike Chief Technology Officer Dmitri Alperovitch said it was similar to other hacking campaigns launched by a unit of the People's Liberation Army that his company has nicknamed 'Putter Panda.' The group, Unit 61486, has thousands of people and conducts intelligence on satellite and aerospace industries, he said.


LinkedIn forecasts strong quarter, driven by hiring business

The logo for LinkedIn Corporation, a social networking networking website for people in professional occupations, is shown in Mountain View (Reuters) - Corporate networking site LinkedIn Corp forecast better-than-expected adjusted profit and revenue in the current quarter, helped by a rapid rise in its hiring business. Analysts on average were expecting a profit of 40 cents per share on revenue of $540.86 million, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S. With more than 300 million members, LinkedIn is approaching saturation point among U.S. white-collar workers so is turning to new businesses such as helping employers find staff and mobile advertising. LinkedIn's hiring business revenues lept 49 percent in the second quarter. Though, nearly half of LinkedIn's 300 million members now access the website through mobile devices, LinkedIn does not break out its revenue contribution from mobile.


Big change coming to "disabilities" logo

Accessibility logo Late last week, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill that will require the removal of the word "handicapped" from signs, and unveiled a new, updated accessibility logo — part of an effort to destigmatize people with disabilities.


NBA-League adding @NBA social media handle to game ball

(Reuters) - The National Basketball Association is adding its @NBA social media identifier to its official game ball starting with the 2014-15 season in October. The Twitter handle will appear under the "Official Game Ball" wording, just to the left of the league's logo, the NBA said in a statement. The move makes the NBA the first professional sports league to put its social media handle on the official game ball of that respective sport, according to the league.

Microsoft ordered by U.S. judge to submit customer's emails from abroad

A shadow of a man using his mobile phone is cast near Microsoft logo at the 2014 Computex exhibition in Taipei By Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp must turn over a customer's emails and other account information stored in a data center in Ireland to the U.S. government, a judge ruled on Thursday, in a case that has drawn concern from privacy groups and major technology companies. Microsoft and other U.S. companies had challenged the warrant, arguing it improperly extended the authority of federal prosecutors to seize customer information held in foreign countries. Following a two-hour court hearing in New York, U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska said a search warrant approved by a federal magistrate judge required the company to hand over any data it controlled, regardless of where it was stored.


Shaw Comms to pay $830 million for data center company ViaWest

By Alastair Sharp TORONTO (Reuters) - Shaw Communications Inc will pay $830 million to buy U.S. data center services provider ViaWest Inc, the Canadian media and cable company said on Thursday, in a deal aimed at bolstering its cloud computing credentials. Shaw said the acquisition from ViaWest majority owner Oak Hill Capital Partners and others would help accelerate the development of its Canadian data center platform. Shaw said that ViaWest has 27 data centers, mostly in the U.S. Southwest, and that Shaw would keep the company in its Denver headquarters as a stand-alone subsidiary whose expertise can be made available to Shaw's own data management and cloud services customers. "With the acquisition of ViaWest, Shaw gains significant capabilities, scale and immediate expertise in the growing marketplace" for data services for business, Chief Executive Officer Brad Shaw said in a news release.

Soccer World Cup helps DirecTV net more subscribers

(Reuters) - DirecTV, the No.1 U.S. satellite TV provider, reported quarterly revenue above analysts' estimates as the soccer World Cup helped it add subscribers in Latin America and prices increased in the United States. The company added 543,000 subscribers in Latin America, its largest growth area, in the second quarter ended June 30. DirecTV had added 165,000 a year earlier in the market, where it is tapping into a growing middle class. "The increase ... was primarily driven by demand related to the Fifa World Cup," the company said on Thursday.

U.S. government warns retailers about malicious software

The U.S. Department Of Homeland Security warned retailers about a type of malicious software attacking point-of-sales systems, dubbed "Backoff," that it said is undetectable by most types of anti-virus software. The agency released a 10-page advisory about the payment-card-stealing virus Backoff on Thursday, saying it has been observed in at least three forensic investigations into breaches of payment systems. The U.S. government has released reports on several types of malicious software that cyber criminals used to steal payment cards in the wake of last year's unprecedented breach on Target Corp, which resulted in the theft of some 40 million payment card numbers. The DHS advisory warned that such malware put both the business and consumer at risk, exposing data including names, credit card numbers, email addresses, mailing address and phone numbers.

Hackers can tap USB devices in new attacks, researcher warns

German crypto specialist Nohl of Berlin's SR Labs is reflected in computer screen in Berlin By Jim Finkle BOSTON (Reuters) - USB devices such as keyboards, thumb-drives and mice can be used to hack into personal computers in a potential new class of attacks that evade all known security protections, a top computer researcher revealed on Thursday. Karsten Nohl, chief scientist with Berlin's SR Labs, noted that hackers could load malicious software onto tiny, low-cost computer chips that control functions of USB devices but which have no built-in shields against tampering with their code. It is almost like a magic trick," said Nohl, whose research firm is known for uncovering major flaws in mobile phone technology. Nohl said his firm has performed attacks by writing malicious code onto USB control chips used in thumb drives and smartphones.


Facebook mobile app to offer free, limited Internet in Zambia

A smartphone user shows the Facebook application on his phone in Zenica, in this photo illustration By Alexei Oreskovic SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook Inc is launching a mobile app that gives users in Zambia free access to a handful of online services on mobile phones, broadening an effort to boost Internet usage in underdeveloped countries. The Internet.org app will offer, in partnership with wireless operator Airtel , more than a dozen services including online encyclopedia Wikipedia, websites devoted to weather, job listings and health information, as well as Facebook's own social network and messaging service.


Internet privacy service Tor warns users it was attacked

By Joseph Menn and Jim Finkle BOSTON Reuters - Tor, the prominent system for protecting Internet privacy, said on Wednesday many of its users trying to reach hidden sites might have been identified by government-funded researchers. In a note on the nonprofit's website, Tor Project leader Roger Dingledine said the service had identified computers on its network that had been quietly altering Tor traffic for five months in an attempt to unmask users connecting to what are known as "hidden services." Dingledine said it was "likely" the attacking computers, which were removed on July 4, were operated on behalf of two researchers at the Software Engineering Institute, which is housed at Carnegie-Mellon University, but funded mainly by the U.S. Department of Defense.

U.S. regulator questions Verizon plan to slow data speeds for some

A sign hangs in the Verizon booth on the first day of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas By Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The top U.S. telecommunications regulator said on Wednesday he is "deeply troubled" by Verizon Communications Inc's plan to slow data downloads for some high-speed wireless customers remaining on the older unlimited data plans. Verizon, the largest U.S. wireless carrier, stopped offering unlimited data plans in 2012 and last week said it will begin slowing services for the top 5 percent of data users who are on such data plans in places where the network is experiencing high demand. "I am deeply troubled by your July 25, 2014 announcement that Verizon Wireless intends to slow down some customers' data speeds on your 4G LTE network starting in October 2014," Wheeler wrote in a letter to Verizon Wireless President and CEO Daniel Mead released by the FCC. "It is disturbing to me that Verizon Wireless would base its 'network management' on distinctions among its customers' data plans, rather than on network architecture or technology.


Microsoft Store Camping World